English Writing Help Center
Writing Informal Letters and E-mail
 
 
 
   
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 

This section contains:
1) A list of expressions used in e-mail
   E-mailの始めほかの人に(から)よろしくがんばってね
   おめでとうございますアドバイスを求める情報を探す
   勧めるお願いをする感謝を表す
   心配している気持ちを表すお詫びを述べる案内状
   Turning Down an Invitationインターネット ショッピングE-mailの終わり
2) Example e-mails

Example e-mails

1)
Hi Scott,
Thanks for the e-mail.  It is always nice to hear from people, especially
from you, Scott.

I have not got any reply, a positive or negative one, from Seibido yet.
Let's wait and hope that it will make a BOOK.

Have you finished your paperwork for Kaken and writing academic articles?
If you have some free time in the near future, I want to meet you and
explain to you our next project. 

Why not drink out in Hiroshima if we are accepted?
We need to celebrate ourselves, don't we? 
Let's have a small end-of-the-year party!

Sincerely,   K. Nakagawa


2)
Dear Dennis,

Hope you are well.

I'm writing to you, yet again, in your capacity as "Answer Man."

One of our David English House teachers has just e-mailed me to see if I
have any more information on "university listening tests" which are to be
administered soon.

I have no information about any such tests.  Do you?  If so, could you
please let me know.

Thank you kindly.

Best regards,
Donna


3)
Hi there, Doreen

Long time no see. Hope all's well in your world! 

I haven't been to JALT all year, shame on me, but I needed the break.
I still see the guys and I'm going to the national, so don't write me off
yet!

I was trying to remember who you've published with in the past, and I
wondered if you had any contacts at Nan'Un-Do. I want to send a
proposal to them but have no names, and the personal touch is always
best!

I might go to see Jane Willis, family commitments permitting, any plans in
that direction? Going to Shizuoka I presume?

Bye for now
All the best
S


4)
Dear Ray,

How are you? 

I think I haven't told you yet.  After workin for  Kobe Kaisei Girls' Junior 
High School, I got a job here at Kure National College of Technology.

Anyway, coming home to Hiroshima, I resumed my research. I know what I
have to do first: To publish the dissertation of mine ... When I was in Kobe,
it was too difficult.

These days I finally finished writing a summary in English,  which is 
required for publication.  Prof. YAMADA gave me  some comments.  But I
wonder if it is free of any unnaturalness.  Could you have a look at the
attached file (it is the summary in question) and give me comments? 
I'm not in such a hurry.

Best wishes


5)
Hi Everyone!
Thought I'd send out a picture of my little monsters.  They had a great 
Halloween yesterday.  Doreen and Dennis came over to hand out candy so
Ray and I were both able to go out with the kids.  They made quite the
haul, the dentist is going to love us!

Doreen and Dennis left this morning for Wisconsin.  They hope to get to
Idaho today.  Judy, you should be seeing them sometime next week.  I
hope they have good weather.  They'll be back here in time for 
Thanksgiving.

I hope you all have a great weekend!

Love, Sue.


6)
Hi George,
Thanks for your reply.  You are always so quick!

I sent an-mail to Mr. Imai of Seibido yesterday, and I just got a phone call
from him.  They want us to send the whole thing and also a "Project 
Plan."  It seems that they have some form to fill in to describe the project 
in Japanese, so I will write something which will appeal to the publsiher.

That's all for now.  Let's hope it will come out!

K. Tanaka


7)
Dear Prof. Lauer,

I hope you are doing fine. I am now in Saitama, but will go back to
Hiroshima to attend the conference. We would like to visit you to say 
thank  you for your cooperation. During this week, WED, THU, and FRI, 
please let me know when you will be in your office. We would like to visit 
you shortly.

Sincerely,
Toshiko


8)
Hi Professor Lauer,

I was asked by Mr. Nagai, the leader of our tennis club to let you know 
that we have made plans for a tennis camp, which is to be held on Nov.
23-24 at Taishakukyou.

We hope you will join the camp. If it's impossible, how about coming on 
either of the two days? I guess we can enjoy seeing autumn leaves as 
well as playing tennis.

All the best.
C. Iwasaki


9)
Hi Dennis,

After the exciting Saturday, I guess you've been doing as good as that
Saturday.  The weather is good, food is good, and studying is good in this
season.  I like this season the best.

Oh, well, this introduction may remind you of students' writing, so I
should stop it now.  To make a long story short (or the introduction 
short?), I am sending you this message to say thank you.  I said so for 
the Saturday already.  Today's "thank you" is to the vocabulary test, 
which was delivered to me today.  On the letter from Professor Tanaka, 
your name was also written, so I assume that you and Prof. Tanaka 
worked together to develop this test.  To tell you the truth, I like it, and I 
do want to use it for my research and classes.  He said that an online 
delivery is being planned.  I wonder if anyone can use the test.  If so, this 
is really great.

Sending you a thank-you message, I would like to ask you a favor.  The
attached is a thank-you letter to  Prof. Tanaka.  Would it be too much to
ask you to print it out and hand it to him?  If so, would you send me back
a "Do it yourself" message.  I'll send it by regular mail.  Or would you let 
me know his mail address.  (I hope he is a regular mail user.  In our school,
there are still quite a few senior professors who don't use e-mail at all.
Yes, AT ALL!  Can you believe that?)

OK, Dennis, sorry for interrupting you with my favor.  Hope to see you
soon again. 

Best wishes,

MAEDA Chiaki
Hamada City University


10)
Dear Sachiko,

Hope you are well and that the second semester is going smoothly for 
you.

The other day when we were talking at the bus stop you mentioned a
web page on which Linda Holkenson detailed her reasons for leaving.

If you don't mind, would you send me the URL for that web page if you
still have it?

Thanks a lot.

Best regards,
Tim Brown


11)
Dear Professor Teaman,

How are you?
Nakai sensei has forwarded your email to me, I would like to have a real
play with you on Wednesday.

By the way, I attached a cover letter that I prepared for applying a
position of fish pathologist in Australia. I would appreciate it very much
if you would check and return it to me on Monday because the deadline 
for application is  Oct. 28.

Thank you in advance and best regards,

Wu


12)
Dear Mr. Broadbent,
        First, I have to apologize for not writing to you on time. I was out in
Okayama playing in a tennis tournament from Oct. 5 to Oct.12. I'm very
sorry.
       Now,let me introduce myself. I'm Hiroki Iwai. I'm 18 years old and a
freshman. I'm in the Faculaty of Education  and I major in math. I want to
be a high school teacher and teach math and tennis to the students in
the future. I usually play tennis after  school as a member of Hiroshima
University Tennis Club. I've played it for over 4 years and I think I'm a
pretty good player. If you like to  play tennis, I'd like to play with you.
       I live in an apartment in Saijo by myself. My parents live in Tokushima,
where I was born and brought up. My sister is a high school
student. And now she studies at a high school in Ohio as an exchange
student. I also want to study abroad in my near future. I am busy every
day as I have to study, practice tennis, and do all the housework.
       However, I enjoy my life in Hiroshima, and would like to try to do
many things. Of course, I'd like to learn a lot from you.

Sincerely  yours, 
Hiroki  Iwai


13)
Hi Naomi,
     Thanks for getting back to me. As I suggested, I would rather have
transportation reimbursed than honorarium. I will donate the
honorarium to the chapter. A rough guess round trip Okayama -
Hiroshima is 10,000 yen. I will e-mail Steve, but it won't be until late 
Friday afternoon at the earliest and Saturday morning at the
latest.
     In the future, I hope the travel reimbursement (or not) policy of the
chapter will become clearer for invited speakers even in the
prefecture.

     Looking forward to Saturday,

Ian


14)
Hi Simon,

I'm now preparing a few materials for the  meeting this weekend. Basically,
I'll just introduce the Sadako's School program with some general
information and some photos, then we can share the
highlights of our own experiences. After that, we can field a few
questions. How does that sound?

Yes, I agree it can be a challenge to meet the needs of a class with
different levels. Good luck with this!

My students have all sent letters to their foster children (including photos
and small gifts), so hopefully we'll get some responses from Cebu by the
end of the month!

See you Saturday,

Adam


15)
Dear Professor Lauer

Having had some trouble calling you, I did drop in last Monday, but I have
since seen Abdellah who told me he'd seen you and you don't go in on
Monday's.

How about you nominate a time for me to call you, or nominate a time for 
me to come and see you or, you can call me if it's easier because I am
mostly here in my wee apartment.

Please let me know.  If you want to call the number is 21-5815.
Otherwise, I'm happy to fit in with you.

Kind regards,

 Aisha


16)
Dear Ray,

Thanks for your e-mail.

I am leaving for Cambodia on Dec. 12 and return to Hiroshim on Jan. 12.
This means that I will have to miss only one class on Dec. 16.
Unfortunately, my friend won't be able to teach that class since he is not
sure if he can make it on time.

I am still interested in teaching the course if you can find any other
teacher to replace me on Dec. 16.

Bye now,

Bill


17)
Joe,

My name is John Fanselow.  I was the Director of the TESOL Program at
Teachers College, Columbia University in Tokyo and New York prior to my
retirement.  I was also president, second vice president and program chair 
of TESOL and president of NYSTESOL. 

During the years, I have done many workshops for JALT and other
affiliates. Breaking Rules, Contrasting Conversations, both from Longman  
and Try the Opposite by SIMUL are the books some know me by.

I am now president of a 500 student college in New Zealand which has 
many Japanese students.  Part of my role as president is to meet parents
of students in Japan.  On my trips to Japan, I usually do workshops. 
Some of these my college--International Pacific College--has arranged.
Sometimes, teachers at schools arrange the workshops and sometimes
JALT chapters have arranged them.

I was wondering whether you would have any interest in co-sponsoring a
workshop for the Hiroshima chapter.  Monday 11 November in the
evening--4-6? or 5-7?  that I will be in Hiroshima and will be free.  (Free 
both in the sense of available and free in the sense that I am volunteering 
my services.)


18)
Kevin:

I've been meaning to write to everyone. But my life has just turned
upside down the past few months. So, I'm glad you wrote. And thank you
for the complement. You've always been very kind and supportive. I like
you as well, and wish you all the luck at Hirodai and where ever else
you and your family may go. And, thank you for your best wishes.

Yes, I've "escaped" Hirodai, but not under the circumstance I would have
wished. In fact, I'm rather sad and disappointed that Koto-Sensei has
not made clear my reasons for resigning. Both of my parents have been
quite ill. I asked for an additional six months leave to stay and take
care of my parents. Koto sent me this amazing letter saying that while
he thinks it was good for society that a law was passed making it
possible for people to take compassion leave, no one should actually
apply for the leave. Well, any way, he made it very clear to me what was
expected of me after I returned, and why I should return. After thinking
about it for some time, I realized that if I did return then I'd still
have to fly back to the USA often to take care of my parents; thus, I
couldn't fulfill my responsibilities to Hirodai. It would also be an
awful burden financially. I saw little options but to resign.

Resigning has been a disaster for my career. I am currently unemployed.

You are free to talk about this with others, but I will circulate a letter of
my own soon. Right now, things are rather crazy. We're moving once
again, something like the fourth time this year, and I've got a conference
to prepare for.

Take care and say hi to Sachiko and George for us!

Jerry


19)
Dear Mike,

I was trying to reach you by phone, but in vain. If it is still not too late, I
would like to teach the English Voluntary Course you had told me about.

Please tell more about it!

Sincerely yours,

Pete


20)
Hi Lissa,

Thanks for note!  I love the boundary waters--did we do it together in boy
scouts?  It's the only time I've been.  My daughter Fay would love to
canoe there--she's now a freshman at NAU in environmental science and
goes backpacking whenever she can.  She always thought she'd go to UA
in Tucson which is like UW -Madison in Wisconsin, but it turned out that
the better program in env. sci. was here and the music program she
wanted.  It's great having her this close.  Have you thought about college
options for George yet?

I'm glad you enjoyed the TJ book.  We took a family trip to Washington,
D.C. this summer and saw the sights and had a family reunion t here too.
Great fun.

I'd love to see a photo of you all, and especially George!  Got one online
you can send me? Come visit us and see Grand Canyon etc. next summer,
if you can!

Love,
George


21)
Elizabeth,

    As kind and inviting as your suggestion is, I regret that I have to
decline at this time.  Right now, both my wife and I have got a couple of
extra things going on at work, and outside of normal work.

    I do think it would be a very nice thing to get together, but it's almost
impossible for us during the week because even without the extra things
we are doing now, our regular weekday evenings and Saturdays are busy
with a myriad of activities - English classes, homework, karate, ballet,
juku, hula, cheerleading practices, and so on.
    Would a Sunday be convenient for you?  I was thinking maybe you'd
like to see the base at Iwakuni.  You'd only need to take the train to
Iwakuni Station, and I would pick you up and give you the grand tour of
the base, as well as Iwakuni (if you are interested).  If a Sunday is not
convenient, then how about a Japanese holiday - like this coming
Monday?  (Monday is a normal work day for the base, although there is no
school on base that day because of a teacher's workshop.)
    Please let me know what you think.

Brandon


22)
Hi Everyone,
In order to celebrate my new life in Hiroshima city,
I would like to invite you to a special house warming party.

When: Friday, 27 September, 2002 at 8 pm
Where: 9-12-203 Hikarimachi 2-Chome

I would like to request that everyone bring something for 4 to 6 people
to eat or drink.

Please RSVP as soon as you can so that I can estimate how many people
will be here and what everyone will bring.

Looking forward to hearing from you.

Timothy Favre


23)
Hi!
    How's everything going?  Things aren't going so well here.  They just
let me know that they are cutting all the full time foreign staff here, so I
will need a job next year. I was wondering if you know anyone that's hiring. 
If you do, please let me know. 
    Also I'm thinking of doing a presentation at Hirodai about how to
database Hot Potatoes score results, and generally discuss cgi and html
applications.  Are you interested?  I'm going to get in touch with Noda-
san and see what I should do.  I'm thinking late August, or early
September.

Keep cool!
Judy Bengston


24)
Hi Howard and Amy...

It was great meeting you this week! You both are VERY NICE.

The chocolate is in our refrigerator now. We look forward to eating it
often throughout this fall!

I hope things go well for you in the coming months, Amy and Howard! I'll
send e-mail again soon.

Love, Reiko.


25)
Hi Johanna! Thanks for the very nice e-mail. I just printed it out for
Hiroko to read later today.

Wow, it sounds like Alicia and Monica had terrible times in the hospital.
But I'm very happy to hear that they are better! And they seem to be
very smart-- getting scholarships! No doubt they have good parents.

In August Bob and I went canoeing for 5 days in the Boundary Waters
of northern Minnesota. That was interesting. But there were mosquitoes
and rain.

Take care, Johanna. When you come to Hiroshima, we'll go out to a
restaurant together!

Love, Michihiro.


26)
Hi Carol,

I hope things are going well with you these days.

Did I hear a rumor that you would be willing to talk at the Hiroshima
JALT meeting at Peace Park on Saturday, October 19?

It would be the same topic as what you're going to do at the national
conference.

If so, I'll put you, Ian Suzuki, and Adam Timmerman on the schedule.
Maybe one or two other people, also. I'll contact you later this month
regarding timing details.

Everyone would be interested in hearing you talk at Hiroshima JALT in
October! I hope you answer "yes."

Sincerely, Jessica.


27)
Dear Keita,

It was so nice to hear from you.  I'm glad school is going well in
Hiroshima.  I'm sure you enjoy the motor club; you are so good with cars.
Do you have your own car now or are you using public transportation? 
When you have an okonomiyaki (not sure of spelling)  in Hiroshima, think
of us. They are soooo delicious.

Jon and I are fine, and Yuki, too.  Jon continues to work hard but he also
enjoys lots of good grilling -- salmon, ribs, chicken.  They all taste so
good when he grills them.  I have enjoyed working with the Bandos so
much, but my last day of tutoring with them was yesterday.  The
company pays for one year of tutoring and that has already passed.  I will
still stay in  contact with them. 

They are such a nice family.  Midori Bando had a great visit in Japan last
week with your mother. Can you send me your family's  current e-mail
address.  I definitely want to stay in touch with them, too. Well, you have
had your English lesson for today by reading this longer  e-mail.  Take
care and continue to stay in touch.  Jon still has his bengoshi e-mail
address, but I can use this one at home more easily.

Rebecca Williams

P.S. Jon says "hi," too.


28)
Julie,

I was glad to hear from you and happy to know that you are confident in
your university life.  We had a good harvest this summer and fall.  Rabbits
are still jumping around but their appetite is under control with fencing. 
We enjoyed tomatoes, okura, cucumbers, and shiso-no-ha, but not
carrots this year.

Temperature dropped below a freezing point about a week ago, and many
autumn flowers, especially cosmos, are now gone.  Enjoy studying
engineering materials.

MIYAZAWA, Hiro


29)
Takafumi,

So nice to hear from you by mail and now by e-mail.  Your classes do
sound challenging, but I have confidence that you can pass Ist Level STEP. 
With such diligent effort, you will also do very well at Hiroshima University. 
Jon and I wish you the very best.

Do you see your family often?  How are they adjusting to life back in
Japan?

Recently, I took some of the Japanese ladies to pick strawberries and
then taught them how to make jam; I wish your mom could have been
with us. She would have enjoyed the activity and your family would have
liked the jam, I think.

Jon and I worked on his "salsa garden" yesterday.  He has a nice crop of
tomatoes and chile peppers planted again this year.

Does your family have an e-mail address?

Take care.  Study hard.  You will always be a welcome visitor in our home.

Don Berg

 
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